As the literature suggests

As the literature suggests, the nature of the training in the public sector has changed over the recent decades. Traditionally, training was considered to be job-focused, limited to the technical skills and abilities needed by public employees to perform specific tasks. As such, it was differentiated from education, which was considered to be broader in scope, more oriented toward a range of future jobs and generally provided by institutions of higher learning. Traditionally, individuals obtained their education first and subsequently received training in the work environment. Recently, the distinction among training, education, and development has become blurred (Van Wart, Cayer, and Cook, 1993). As public organizations find themselves needing to help employees learn about new technologies and skills, training, in many instances, has begun to look like what has traditionally been called education. The on-going debate in academia over the content of the courses suggested in MBA and PhD programs is illustrative of the nature of these discussions