Asthma Rund Alsaid 9B 10/15/18 What is Asthma

Asthma

Rund Alsaid
9B
10/15/18

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What is Asthma?
Also called bronchial asthma it is “A condition in which a person’s airways become inflamed, narrow and swell, and produce extra mucus, which makes it difficult to breathe.” This basically means that Asthma is a very important disease which can be triggered to cause the body to produce extra mucus. When the body produces extra mucus, it causes the person to have trouble breathing which can be life threatening. This is a very important disease that is taken seriously by many patients and can range from mild to life threatening. For some of the people that have asthma, it isn’t particularly an issue but for others it can be interfering with their daily lives and can be very life threatening to the point it can lead to an asthma attack.
How is Asthma caused?
Asthma can be caused by different things depending on each person but some causes are: allergens, irritants, respiratory illness, physical activity, stress, and the cold weather. An example of allergens can be pollen from trees or grass. Example of irritants could be any strong scent like perfume and it can even be dust. An example of respiratory illness can be a cold with a cough or the flu. An example of stress can be stress over anything like homework, tests, relationships, and even more. Lastly, an example of the weather can be if the person who has asthma is outside in extremely cold weather this can trigger asthma.
How many kinds of Asthma are there?
“There are two types of asthma: allergic (caused by exposure to an allergen) and nonallergic (caused by stress, exercise, illnesses like a cold or the flu, or exposure to extreme weather, irritants in the air or some medications).” This means that Asthma can vary from person to person. Some people can be sensitive to something that another person won’t be sensitive to and that is completely normal because everyone is different. The allergic type of asthma is more likely to happen to a person who’s allergic to anything while the nonallergic type is likely to happen to a person who’s not allergic to anything.
Can Asthma be cured?
“Asthma is a long-term disease that has no cure. The goal of asthma treatment is to control the disease. Good asthma control will prevent chronic and troublesome symptoms, such as coughing and shortness of breath, Prevent asthma attacks that could result in an emergency room visit or hospital stay.” This exemplifies the fact that Asthma cant be cured no matter what but can only be controlled. You have to take care of your body if you have asthma because it has to be controlled or else you will come to problems ex: hospital visits.
What is an Asthma attack?
“An asthma attack is a sudden worsening of asthma symptoms caused by the tightening of muscles around your airways (bronchospasm). During the asthma attack, the lining of the airways also becomes swollen or inflamed and thicker mucus — more than normal — is produced. All of these factors — bronchospasm, inflammation, and mucus production — cause symptoms of an asthma attack such as difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and difficulty performing normal daily activities.”
Basically, an asthma attack is when your body suddenly starts to produce extra mucus than usual. Also your airways become filled with this extra mucus and become swollen and blocked making it hard to breathe. This is an extremely dangerous situation for the person going through the asthma attack. “An asthma attack can be triggered by exposure to an allergen, such as tree, grass or weed pollen, dust mites, cockroaches or animal dander. Other common triggers are irritants in the air, such as smoke or chemical fumes, and strong odors, such as perfume.”
How can Asthma be prevented?
You really cannot cure it so at least you can try to prevent it from becoming worse. You can have a plan in case you suddenly get an asthma attack so you know what to do. “Get vaccinated for influenza and pneumonia. Staying current with vaccinations can prevent flu and pneumonia from triggering asthma flare-ups.” This point is also extremely important because it can prevent your asthma symptoms from getting so much more extreme. If your doctor prescribed you medicine, you should take it when you need to and the exact amount.
What are the most important things about Asthma?
Asthma can sometimes be extremely hard to live with for certain people. But the trick is to help yourself at the most important parts. You can have a Asthma attack and you have to help yourself to get back together. Apparently Asthma gets the worst in the middle of the night for various reasons but one of them can be, your body clock which basically means how your body makes certain substances that fight against Asthma but these substances can go down after you have been sleeping for hours. Another reason could be if you have terrible sinus or even if you are infected by a sinus infection. The last reason can be if you have “heartburn which is caused by stomach acid backing up into your esophagus or sometimes into your throat.” All these reasons can make your Asthma get extremely worse especially at night. Surprisingly, some medications from over the counter can actually trigger Asthma attacks.

Facts about Asthma
• Currently, 26.5 million Americans have asthma. Of the 26.5 million, 20.3 million (8.3%) are adults and 6.1 million (8.3%) are children.
• Patients with asthma reported 11 million visits to a doctor’s office and 1.7 million visits to hospital outpatient departments.
• Asthma prevalence is higher in children (9.4 percent) than in adults (7.7 percent), and higher in females (9.2 percent) than males (7.0 percent).
• More than 3,500 people die of asthma each year, nearly half of whom are age 65 or older. Recent statistics show that half of people with asthma have at least one asthma attack each year, with children (53 percent) more likely to have an attack than adults (44.9 percent).
• Weather conditions such as extremely dry, wet or windy weather can worsen an asthma condition.
• Asthma is the most common chronic illness in childhood, accounting for 13.8 million missed school days each year. It also accounts for 14.2 million lost work days for adults.
About Asthma Inhalers
There are so many different asthma inhalers that serve so many different purposes. They all contain different medicines to help the patient when they need it the most. Some inhalers get activated from an actual pump and others are activated from your breath so these are just two kinds but there are other mechanisms of inhalers. “The most common asthma inhalers are the brown inhaler (for prevention) and the blue inhaler (for attacks of asthma and/or prevention).” These all put medicine into your lungs so that you can start to breathe better. When the medicine gets to your lung it makes the inflammation go down so you can start to feel better.
Home Remedies for Asthma
“Eating a healthy diet supplies asthma sufferers with antioxidants and nutrients to combat environmental toxins, control inflammatory responses and reduce dietary triggers. Eating a wide variety of foods can ensure that you or your child gets all the nutrients needed to support strong immunity.” You can also help by eliminating dairy, oils, gluten, and processed carbohydrates. These options really help a lot with people suffering from asthma. So all you have to do is just eliminate these things from your diet and you should feel a bit better. You can even take supplements of Vitamin D which will support your immune system so much and will slow your lung inflammation.

Sources
https://draxe.com/asthma-natural-remedies/
https://www.zavamed.com/uk/asthma-inhalers.html
https://acaai.org/news/facts-statistics/asthma
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/asthma/symptoms-causes/syc-20369653
https://acaai.org/asthma/symptoms/asthma-attack
https://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/asthma-attack#1
https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/asthma
https://acaai.org/asthma/about
https://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/what-is-asthma#1