The New England Colonies were made up of New Hampshire

The New England Colonies were made up of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. In 1630 ships carrying over one thousand immigrants, landed in Massachusetts and founded the port town of Boston. Made up of White English settlers, their main purpose for colonizing was religious freedom without fear of persecution. Since the farming of crops like grains and raising livestock was more for the sustainability of the family, they invested in growing cash crops like tobacco and sugar which were in high demand in England. This coupled with their numerous harbors encouraged trade. They also utilized water surrounding them harnessing the power to operate sawmills and grain mills. Their forests in the Northeast were also offered an abundance of timber which supplied them with the means to build ships. This rich commodity and their many ports enabled them to sail worldwide. Since so much of their livelihoods revolved around the harbors and the water they mainly built their villages and towns near them. That and having less land to spread out created close living quarters which resulted in places they called “common places” where they would meet.

The Middle Colonies were made up of New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey. Unlike the New England Colonies, the Middle Colonies possessed much more favorable variables for farming. Having rich soil and a more amicable climate to farming, which made growing grain and raising livestock much easier. However, farming was not their only source of food, they also had access to lowlands and rivers that allowed for fishing for those that did not farm. Another way they were different was in the diversity of their people and religions. Immigrants came from a much wider variety of countries to settle in the Middle Colonies. In 1682 the town of Philidelphia was founded by William Penn Jr. Whose quest was to form a religious colony. Since goods like potter and fabrics were in high demand they developed the Triangle Trade (16th to 19th century). This trade route allowed for goods to be transported through the Colonies, Africa, and Europe.

The Southern Colonies consisted of North and South Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia. Unlike the New England and Middle Colonies, they did not have small communities and commons places to meet mainly because there was more land. They too like the Middle Colonies had rich farm land, and though slave labor was rampant across the colonies, it thrived in the Southern Colonies. Since the plantation owners were not paying for labor they were making hand over fist in profit which aided their lavish lifestyle mimicking their lives overseas. Like the New England Colonies, the Soutern Colonies had a port in Charleston, South Carolina which was the largest for the South. Also, they had lush, dense forests like those in the Northeast which aided in their timber trade. The South also sported very favorable conditions for farming like that of the Middle Colonies, but Southern Colonies were able to grow more than just tobacco and take on a variety of crops. There was some variety in the immigrants that came over to the Southern Colonies, mostly Irish and Scottish. Something that set them apart as well was a more prominent class system; you had the rich plantation owners, immigrants who were hired workers, and then slaves.