Types of Learning Style Sound in film refers to everything we hear in a movie including words

Types of Learning Style
Sound in film refers to everything we hear in a movie including words, sound effects and music. Sound is also essential for film to create mood in the film, telling us the location or time of a certain scene. The types of sound in film is divided into two which is diegetic and non-diegetic (refer to Figure 1 in Appendix 1). Diegetic sound are all those audio elements that come from sources inside the film or on screen. Meanwhile, non-diegetic sound refers to all those audio elements that come from outside of the fictional world we see on the screen.
The diegetic word originated from the Greek word “diegesis” that means recounted story. Diegetic sound can also be defined as the actual sound from the movie (Thom,1999). Technically, diegetic sound is whose source is visible on the screen or implied to be present by the action in the film. There are few examples of diegetic sound which is voices of the characters which is the dialogue or narration in the movie, sounds made by the objects visible in the movie, and also the music represented as coming from instruments in the story space. Diegetic sound can be either on screen or off screen depending on it’s source within the frame or outside the frame.
According to Carlsson (2004), non-diegetic sound is a sound that does not occur as part of the action and cannot be heard by the film’s characters (background) and can only be heard by audience. Non-diegetic sound, which includes music or voiceover, is largely determined by artistic choices and can greatly impact the tone of a film. Non-diegetic sounds consists of impersonal narration, music and sound effects. Impersonal narration in film is a narration spoken by a voice which does not belong to a character in the fiction, or to any narrator built into the fiction (Raskin, 1992). Next is music, a non-diegetic music in a film is generally referred to as the score or soundtrack that are added into the film externally to give the film a mood and create emotion. The term score generally refers to orchestral background music, while lyrical music used in films (as opposed to instrumental) is generally referred to as the soundtrack. The music is accompanying the scene but not originating from the actual scene. Sound effects in non-diegetic sound is a sound that is added in post-production (after the shooting stops). Sound effects can also be called as foley effects. Foley effects are named after an sound effect from the United States artist whom is Jack Foley For example , sounds such as footsteps, crockery clinking, paper folding, punches hitting, glass breaking, clothes rustling, doors opening and slamming were created in a studio to enhance the existing ambient sounds in the scene ( Almo, 2016).
According to Nozaic (2006) , non-diegetic sound is a sound that does not happen as a feature of the activity and can’t be heard by the film’s characters and can be heard by the audience. Non-diegetic sound, which incorporates music or voiceover, is largely dictated by important decisions and can significantly affect the tone of a film. Non-diegetic sounds consists of impersonal narration, music and sound effects. Impersonal narration in film is a story which is told by a voice which does not have a place with a character in the fiction, or to any storyteller incorporated with the fiction. Next is music, a non-diegetic music in a film is for the most part referred to as the score or soundtrack that are added into the film externally to give the film a state of mind and emotion. The term score is instrumental ambient melodies that are produced by a group of orchestra, while soundtrack is the lyrical music that are being used in the film itself. The music is accompanying the scene however it is not originating from the genuine scene in camera. Sound effects in non-diegetic sound is a sound that is included after the shooting stops (post-production) . Sound effects can likewise be called as foley effects. Foley effects are named after a sound designer from the United States whom is Jack Foley. For instance , sounds like foot steps, ceramics clunking, paper folding, punches hitting, glass breaking, garments stirring, doors opening and slamming were recorded and made in a studio to improve the current ambient sounds in the scene.