Work is central to most of our lives

Work is central to most of our lives, not just as the foundation that enables us to get by in the world, but as key to how we see and define ourselves and to our sense of self-worth. Being unemployed, by contrast hurt. And most of us will know, either firsthand or through people we know, that being unemployed is particularly painful when you are young (ACEVO, 2011).
Unemployment depends on the range of factors. First of all, it is the number of people, who need work, then, the policy of the country aimed at the provision its citizens with workplaces and finally, the level of education and skills of the unemployed ( Blackburn ,1988). Youth unemployment as defined by United Nation (2001) is simply the unemployment of youth.
Accordingly, the International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates that nearly 75 million young people are unemployed in the world today. This number has increased by more than 4 million since the financial crisis of 2008-9, and the outlook for the medium term is worsening. The global youth unemployment rate is 12.7 percent in 2012, and the ILO projects that it is likely to rise to 12.9 percent by 2017.The sheer magnitude of the youth employment challenge has been gradually penetrating people’s awareness over the last decade, and raising the profile of the issue for governments and policymakers. Increasingly there is a realization that the level of youth unemployment is not simply a mirror of the business cycle, but a persistent structural issue that has distinct causes and requires distinct solutions that cut across fiscal, labor, social security, and education policies (ILO, 2012).